First Liberty taking on hostility to religious tenants

Monday, February 10, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Bible study group 1A Florida woman will be allowed to host a Bible study in her home again.

Donna Dunbar held a small Bible study once a week in the social room of Cambridge House Condominiums in Port Charlotte, Florida. Attorney Jeremy Dys of First Liberty Institute, the religious liberty law firm representing Dunbar, says she was denied access to the room in 2018 for meetings based on their religious content.

"It's against the law for a management association to deny you the use of a shared common space for religious purposes," Dys tells OneNewsNow.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) investigated after receiving the complaint from First Liberty on behalf of Dunbar arguing this action violated the Fair Housing Act.

"The good news is that Donna and her group of friends there at her local condominium, they're going to be able to return to hosting their Bible studies once again," cheers Dys. "They can actually use the same space that everybody else uses to gather to have community activities in to be able to have their Bible study as well. So in other words, the association is going to finally start treating Donna and her friends with the same amount of fairness and dignity as everybody else."

Dys

First Liberty was involved in a similar case out of Virginia that involved a retired Lutheran minister. In that case, Pastor Ken Hauge is once again hosting a Bible study at his senior living community.

"There are other cases throughout these United States where individuals, and especially older Americans, are facing some hostile treatment from their management company or their HOA or their condominium association for trying to use the public spaces, the shared spaces, for religious purposes," says Dys. "If that's happening in your neck of the woods, I hope you'll … let us know about the situation."

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