Gov't and religious liberty rights

Wednesday, January 22, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Little Sisters of the Poor outside courtAn attorney thinks "it's about time" that the Supreme Court hear oral arguments in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania.

"It's about time the Supreme Court resolve this question once and for all and protect the religious liberty rights of non-profits like the Little Sisters of the Poor," says attorney Stephanie Taub of First Liberty Institute, a religious liberty law firm that filed a friend of the court brief in this case. "They've spent years fighting against the contraception mandate for the simple right not to be forced to facilitate insurance coverage for something that goes against their religious beliefs."

While the cases are related, this is not the same exact thing as Little Sisters of the Poor v. Burwell.

"Under the Obama administration, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) imposed the contraceptive mandate, which required insurance plans to cover contraceptives, and it had only a very narrow religious exemption at first," says Taub. "When President Trump took office, that's when HHS finally granted a full exemption to people with moral and religious objections to contraceptives."

But then a group of states sued to stop HHS from protecting groups with sincere or moral objections, and that, Taub says, is "the case that we have right now."

Taub

"Previously, the fight was about whether the federal government was required to respect religious liberty rights, and now the fight is about whether the government is required not to respect religious liberty rights, whether the government has the discretion to grant religious exemptions," she poses to put it another way.

And Taub says even those who may not have a problem with birth control should also pay attention to and care about this case.

"Administrative agencies could be prevented from trying to respect religious beliefs in a variety of contexts," Taub explains. "The federal government needs the freedom to be able to take everything into consideration, including the religious beliefs of people that might be affected. At First Liberty Institute, we believe that no one should be forced to violate their religious beliefs, no matter what those are."

A date has not yet been set for oral argument in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Just once, I'd like to see the secular media …

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Curfews ordered in more than dozen US cities
Protests heat up across US, governors call in National Guard
FBI says its top lawyer is leaving the bureau
‘Back in the game’: SpaceX ship blasts off with 2 astronauts
National Guard summoned to aid cities amid police clashes
Pentagon puts military police on alert to go to Minneapolis
What’s behind latest India-China border tension

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump says will not allow mob violence to rule
Knife-wielding woman shot and killed by police, days after her brother was arrested for ISIS terror plot
Opinion — Andrew McCarthy: Laws against rioting and terrorism must be enforced against Antifa and other violent radicals
Supreme Court rejects challenge to limits on church services; Roberts sides with liberals
In unusual move, US embassies in Africa speak up on Floyd

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Second judge ends 'transition' push for TX boy

gavel brown 620x300A mother who insists her son is a transgender girl has lost another battle in court.