Back to his calling: Bible study & prayer with neighbors

Tuesday, January 14, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Ken Hauge (1st Liberty client)It took months of haggling, but a retired Lutheran pastor is holding Bible study again at his senior living community.

"The lawsuit that was filed back in May over Ken Hauge's ability to hold a Bible study in his apartment complex's community room was favorably settled," says attorney Lea Patterson of First Liberty Institute, the law firm representing Ken Hauge (pictured) and his wife, Liv. "We're very excited." (See earlier story)

The Hauges have resided at the Evergreens at Smith Run in Fredericksburg, Virginia, since 2017. Last year, says Patterson, they filed a lawsuit after the Evergreens adopted a policy prohibiting religious activities in the apartment building's community room. At the behest of other senior residents, Ken had been leading a small Bible study in his personal capacity.

"We filed suit in the Eastern District of Virginia," the attorney explains, "and that suit was filed under the Fair Housing Act alleging that restricting religious activities in the common areas violated Fair Housing requirements."

Patterson

The settlement lifts the restriction on religious activities and allows the Hauges to resume hosting the Bible study. The settlement also rescinds the July 2018 notice the Hauges received that threatened eviction if he continued the Bible study in his apartment. Ken had moved it there after being notified of the policy regarding the community room.

"I am thankful to First Liberty Institute and Hunton Andrews Kurth for fighting on my behalf and look forward to meeting once again with my friends and neighbors to pray and study God's Word together," says Ken Hauge, in a statement provided through First Liberty.

First Liberty is involved in a similar case out of Florida with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Read First Liberty's page on this case

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