LA law seeks to take care of women

Thursday, December 26, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with U.S. flagAn observer who has his eye on a particular Supreme Court case says the New Year will bring plenty of legal disputes.

"The biggest case right now that's on the Supreme Court's radar is a pro-life law out of Louisiana that requires abortionists to have admitting privileges," reports Steven Ertlet, editor of Life News. "Why is that needed? Because abortion is dangerous. We know that abortion kills children, but it also hurts women."

Medically speaking, he points out that there are a number of ways in which women can be injured by abortion.

Ertelt

"The sad truth is that the abortion industry has no interest in protecting women," Ertelt laments. "They go on and on and on talking about women's rights and women's health, 'abortion is healthcare,' but when it comes right down to actually protecting women's health, they refused to do that. So Louisiana passed a law saying you've got to take care of women if you're doing abortions."

The abortion industry, however, is challenging the law in court. One big argument involves the Supreme Court striking down what certain individuals, special interest groups, and news outlets consider to be "a very similar law in Texas" in 2016.

But Attorney General Jeff Landry (R-Louisiana), Solicitor General Liz Murrill, and Louisiana Right to Life tell OneNewsNow that Louisiana's case is different, and they welcome the Supreme Court argument, which is scheduled for March 2020.

Clapper

"The Texas law included more information or more requirements for ambulatory surgical center requirements, and the Louisiana law does not include that, so it's more precisely focused on the admitting privileges law," Louisiana Right to Life's Benjamin Clapper told OneNewsNow in October 2019. "In addition, Texas' geographical situation and [its] situation with number of abortion businesses is far different than Louisiana. The 2016 decision used the geography of Texas when making its decision, so we think if they're using that, they should be using that in the Louisiana case, and the result should be different because of that."

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