SCOTUS asked – again – to take Christian florist's case

Monday, December 23, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Barronelle Stutzman (Christian florist)A Washington state florist is still watching and waiting for the Supreme Court to take up her high-profile case.

"She has once again asked the United States Supreme Court to consider and review a lower court decision that was against her," says attorney Greg Baylor at Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF)," the law firm representing Barronelle Stutzman. "The petition is before the Court and we're just waiting for them to receive all of the briefing and then move ahead with deciding whether or not to take the case."

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Washington state attorney general claim Stutzman is guilty of unlawful discrimination for declining to use her creative skills to celebrate the same-sex "wedding" ceremony of her longtime customer, Robert Ingersol.

Baylor

Her attorney explains that Stutzman is a Christian who believes in traditional marriage and who "serves all people, including people who identify as homosexual – but she's unwilling to assist, participate, help celebrate a same-sex wedding ceremony."

Federal legislation from Representative Chris Stewart (R-Utah) aims to satisfy the LGBTQ community and people with religious freedom concerns. However, the ACLU says the so-called "Freedom For All Act" does not protect LGBTQ people.

Meanwhile, Alliance Defending Freedom says that legislation doesn't protect Stutzman from the Washington state law from which she has been prosecuted. "Fairness for All is not a solution for Barronelle – and the problem is Fairness for All will create more circumstance like the one Barronelle has experienced," the legal firm explains.

In July 2017, ADF petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to take up Stutzman's case. In June 2018, the Court sent the case back to the Washington Supreme Court, after vacating that court's decision and instructing it to reconsider her lawsuit in light of the decision in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission.

In June 2019, the Washington Supreme Court ruled against Stutzman a second time. ADF attorneys have once again asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take her case.

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