Trump artist in legal scrape over display at Smithsonian

Wednesday, December 11, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Artist Raven with Trump portaitAn artist is fighting for the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery to include his portrait of President Donald Trump.

Julian Raven (pictured with the portrait) has even gone to the U.S. Supreme Court to make the Gallery add his portrait to its collection. Born in the United Kingdom, Raven became a U.S. citizen in 2015 and says he was inspired by God to paint a picture of then-candidate Donald Trump.

"Having shown it all over the country, a common comment that I received from people from New York to Los Angeles was this should be in the Smithsonian."

The 8-foot-by-16-foot portrait includes a likeness of Donald Trump next to an eagle, a U.S. flag, and planet Earth.

Regardless, Raven says the Gallery has refused to hang his portrait because of what he calls an anti-Trump bias.

"The director of the Smithsonian is an overt, anti-Trump leftist," the artist says of Kim Sajet. "And the day after President Trump was inaugurated, she went to the anti-Trump Women's March and was there protesting basically and tweeting how much she loved that march," says Raven.

"The last thing she said to me [in 2016] was – after I refuted all of her arbitrary objections to why my painting should not be hung – she said I'm the director of the National Portrait Gallery, your application is going nowhere, you can appeal it all you want and she hangs up the phone – and she called me!"

Raven is acting as his own attorney in his legal battle.

OneNewsNow contacted the Smithsonian Institution for comment and received the following response from chief spokesperson Linda St. Thomas:

"Mr. Raven brought this to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and lost, and then to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit which affirmed the decision of the lower court. We have no comment on his request to be heard by the Supreme Court."

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Should the U.S. Senate allow witnesses for the impeachment trial?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Pro-gun rally by thousands in Virginia ends peacefully
As trial nears, Trump lawyers call impeachment case 'flimsy'
Illegal crossings plunge as US extends policy across border
2 dead, 15 injured in Kansas City bar brawl
Iraqi officials: 3 dead, dozens wounded in Baghdad protests

LATEST FROM THE WEB

California tells ranch owners, 'Your land is our land'
Frederick Douglass vs. MLK: Competing visions for social justice?
All nonprofits should be terrified of this new court decision
Watch Adam Schiff tell three laughable impeachment whoppers in less than 90 seconds
Apple is right to refuse to help the FBI hack into iPhones. The federal government can’t be trusted with additional surveillance powers

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
LA law seeks to take care of women

gavel with U.S. flagAn observer who has his eye on a particular Supreme Court case says the New Year will bring plenty of legal disputes.