Keep fighting, pro-lifers -- We're winning

Wednesday, December 11, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Supreme Court sunriseA pro-life leader believes the Supreme Court's recent decision to leave an ultrasound law in place is the start of great news for years to come.

"For years, we've been able to pass pro-life legislation in the state legislatures only to have the abortion industry go into court to challenge them, and many of them were struck," says Carol Tobias, president of the National Right to Life Committee. "We are now seeing a slight turn in the courts where they are willing to leave pro-life laws intact, and I think we're going to see more of that as our president is appointing more judges who will strictly interpret the Constitution. So this is definitely a sign that we need to keep fighting, because we're winning."

Fox News reports the American Civil Liberties Union had challenged the law on behalf of Kentucky's lone remaining abortion clinic. But on Monday, the Supreme Court decided to leave in place the ultrasound law that requires doctors to perform ultrasounds and show fetal images to patients before performing abortions.

Tobias

"I think that is a great decision by the Supreme Court," Tobias cheers. "The law was in effect because the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals refused to strike it, and the court agreed with the appellate court."

Still, she would like to see justices take on the split decisions on cases dealing with banning dismemberment procedures.

"That's something that I would love to see go to the court," Tobias tells OneNewsNow. "Or pain- capable unborn children -- Can they be aborted?"

The pro-lifer thinks the country would and should hear about babies who feel pain and are dying by dismemberment.

"Neither of those pieces of legislation are close to getting to the Supreme Court level, but we're certainly hoping that we can get them up there at some point," she concludes.

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