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It's good to see a principled judiciary

Friday, November 8, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

judge banging gavel 1Democrats may be trying to impeach him or beat him in next year's election, but one thing is certain: President Trump will have had a lasting impact on the federal judiciary.

"The judges he's nominating, as a group, they are the best group we've ever had," thinks Phillip Jauregui, president of Judicial Action Group. "There will be a tremendous number of them, and, of course, we already have two Supreme Court justices, and I think the odds are he'll get … additional seats on the Supreme Court."

Jauregui is not alone in his opinion. In an op-ed for FoxNews.com, Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) writes these new judges are principled constitutionalists who have demonstrated excellence and professionalism throughout their legal careers.

Still, Jauregui has concerns about two judicial nominees.

"One is Halil Suleyman Ozerden to the Fifth Circuit, and the other is Patrick Bumatay to the Ninth Circuit," says Jauregui. "There have been other presidents, Republican presidents, President Reagan for example, that made some mistakes. So this isn't taking a shot at President Trump, [as] I think he is a great president and has done a great job. But there are some nominees that are very, very concerning and I'd like to see stopped."

American Family Association is opposed to Ozerden, even going so far as to flat-out urge citizens to tell their senators not to confirm him.

In an Action Alert to its supporters, AFA reports that Ozerden, a district judge for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi, refused to hear the complaint of the Catholic Diocese of Biloxi, whose leaders said the ObamaCare contraceptive mandate violated their religious liberty and their deeply-held religious belief in the sanctity of human life.

Jauregui

"We certainly don't want senators just being a rubber stamp," Jauregui continues. "The Senate has a role in confirming and giving their consent to these nominees, and so it's important for the senators to hear from their constituents that they're looking to them to really give a good review on these nominees, to do their research, and to make sure that these are going to be great judges for the future."

The Judicial Action Group president continues to point out that a judge does not serve a two-year, four-year, or a six-year term like a senator; they can serve for 50 years. And that is why it is so important for senators to get it right.

At least 158 federal judges have been confirmed by the Senate, and more nominations are being considered.

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