Students told to bring Bibles to school without apology

Friday, September 27, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Bible 1October 3 marks Bring Your Bible to School Day, and one law firm wants to make sure students know their rights as they enter campus gates.

Pacific Justice Institute (PJI) President Brad Dacus indicates that campus politics demonizes Christians for their beliefs in biblical morality and treats their religious expression as hate speech.

"As public schools become more and more intolerant and even hostile to students because of their Christian faith, we felt it important to empower students to be open about their faith and not to fear ramifications or persecution," Dacus, shared.

PJI has provided numerous resources to enable and empower students to live and express their faith, but this year is the first time the law firm has produced a resource in the form of a handout that champions and defends students' rights to bring their Bible to school. In addition, Focus on the Family -- which sponsors this annual event -- has posted a frequently asked questions page on its website to serve as a quick resource to empower students to know their rights and freely share and express their faith on campus.

"Students are free to bring their Bible to school every day of the school year, and, in fact, [they] can read it, can study it, can discuss it – so long as it's not during classroom time," Dacus maintained. "This Bring Your Bible to School Day will hopefully enlighten and encourage students to do this – not just on October third, but at other times, as they're called and led to do so throughout the year."

Dacus invites students to contact Pacific Justice Institute if they face any reprisal from teachers or any school staff.

"The event is designed to empower you as a student to express your belief in the truth of God's Word, and to do so in a respectful way that demonstrates the love of Christ," states the FAQ page on the Bring Your Bible to School Day website. "Participation is voluntary and student-directed, meaning it's completely up to students, Christian clubs and youth groups to sign up online. and then lead the activities in their school."

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