TN pro-lifer praises 48-hour law, AG defending it

Friday, August 23, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

hand with ultrasound wandA federal court will hear arguments next month over Tennessee's 48-hour waiting period for an abortion.

The waiting period requirement was signed into law in 2015 but has been tied up in the court process ever since.

"We've been waiting on this for a long time and it'll be in trial September 23rd," says Will Brewer, legislative liaison for Tennessee Right to Life. "We fully suspect it to be successful there."

Attorneys representing Planned Parenthood, the nation’s biggest abortion provider, stated in court documents that the law violate the Equal Protection Clause “by restricting women's ability to make autonomous, voluntary decisions concerning their reproductive lives and their medical care…”

Brewer's response? Unless there is an emergency, it’s routine for any surgery procedure to begin with consultation and then schedule the procedure.

pregnant woman hand“So this is the type of procedure that requires a lot of thinking, and a lot of emotional considerations,” he says, “and it shouldn't be made in a rush.”

Despite the ongoing court fight, the 48-hour waiting period has been state law and Brewer insists it has saved lives and helped women.

"It gives them time to consult their families, to consult their faith leaders, and to make an informed decision,” he tells OneNewsNow. “And typically those women decide to opt for the side of life, and whether that's adoption or whether that's keeping that child, whatever that may be, this type of law is saving lives and so it is proving to be very effective."

Tennessee’s attorney general Herbert Slatery III will defend the law in court.

Brewer says Slatery, a Republican, has been supportive of the pro-life issue and pro-lifers, are grateful for a “vigorous advocate” in the attorney general’s office, he adds. 

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