AL man pursuing lawsuit over aborted 'Baby Roe'

Thursday, March 7, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

hand with ultrasound wandA court in Alabama has recognized an aborted baby as a person with legal rights, advancing a closely-watched lawsuit.

The decision in Madison County probate court allows Ryan Magers to sue Alabama Women's Center, the abortionist, and a pharmaceutical company for the abortion of his child, identified in court filings as "Baby Roe."

As OneNewsNow reported in February, Magers wanted his girlfriend at the time to keep the baby. She did not and they are no longer a couple.

"This was kind of a preliminary step for filing the suit for wrongful death," says Brent Helms, the attorney for Ryan Magers.

"What this means," he continues, "is not only was Ryan able to file on his own behalf as the father, but because we've opened an estate for Baby Roe, he's actually able to represent Baby Roe himself. So he's representing his aborted child, the estate at least of his aborted child."

The parties being sued by Magers have until April 1 to respond to the lawsuit over wrongful death.

"With regards to opening the estate for the aborted baby, I don't know that they'll take any action against that," says Helms. "Even if they did, the law is so in our favor on that. We would still be victorious."

This is the first time that Helms has been involved in a case such as this and he believes it may be a first for the nation.

"This most recent development is the first time in my research I have found that an estate has ever been opened for an aborted child," he adds.

Because of the nature of the lawsuit, Helms has done several interviews of late, including appearances on Fox News and NPR, and a mention in The Washington Post.

"I'm not looking for any publicity, just trying to do my job," he insists. "If there was another case like this, I would love to speak to the attorneys handling that case."


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