Louisiana awaits high court decision on pro-life law

Friday, February 1, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Supreme Court sunrisePro-lifers in Louisiana are watching and waiting to see if the U.S. Supreme Court will delay enforcement of a pro-life law.

The state's Unsafe Abortion Protection Act, also known as Act 620, requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

The law was passed in 2014 but has since been through various courts, including the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals which ruled in favor of Louisiana. As a result, the Center for Reproductive Rights is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to delay enforcement of the law.

According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, the law cannot stand after the high court ruled against a similar law in Texas.

The pro-abortion organization also predictably claims the law harms women but Louisiana Solicitor General Liz Murrill says the law actually protects the health and safety of women.

"We are always going to fight to uphold what we think are common sense regulations that protect women's health," Murrill tells OneNewsNow.

Murrill points out that the abortion doctors in the lawsuit sabotaged their own claims.

"If they obtained privileges, then it contradicts their narrative that they can't do it," she explains. "That was true in this case. One of the doctors obtained privileges the week of trial, so the record shows they can obtain privileges if they are in fact competent, and they are seeking and they have qualifications and credentials to obtain privileges."

emergency lights ambulanceTwo abortion clinics in Louisiana did close during the course of this litigation but Murrill says it was for reasons unrelated to the effects of the law.

"I have seen in a number of press reports that comments have been made that those clinics closed because of the act and that is fundamentally wrong," she continues. "Those two clinics closed because they had been cited by the state department of health, including failing to comply with mandatory reporting of possible sex crimes against minor girls."

According to Murrill, one clinic subsequently turned its license in --- then shredded its patients' records.

"We have good reason to believe that the other one did exactly the same thing, and that's a crime under Louisiana law," she says.

If the U.S. Supreme Court rules in favor of the law, it goes into effect Monday, February 4.

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