State trying to ruin baker begs court for mercy

Thursday, January 10, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Masterpiece Cakeshop (entrance)Attorneys representing Christian baker Jack Phillips say they are optimistic about the latest case against their client, who is now fighting back with a lawsuit of his own.

On the very same day in 2017 the U.S. Supreme Court announced it would hear Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, a Denver attorney phoned Masterpiece and asked for a "gender transition" cake, with a pink interior and a blue exterior.

"Because of Jack Phillips's religious beliefs about sex and gender, and the fact that God gives us our sex and that is something we can't change or choose, that is something that he wasn't able to create," says attorney Jim Campbell of Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), which is still representing the baker after winning a narrow SCOTUS decision for him last year.

Campbell made his comments on the "Washington Watch" radio program, reminding the audience that the Denver attorney then filed a complaint with the state of Colorado, which followed up with its own charges.

The attorney who demanded the transition cake is "Autumn" Scardina, a biological male whose law firm website states that that "her mission is to show her clients that we are stronger than everything they taught us that we should fear." 

Colorado officials could have concluded the "gender transition" request was an obvious attempt to harass Phillips, Campbell said, but instead those officials used it as an opportunity to join the ongoing attempt to force Phillips to capitulate or close his business.   

Jack Phillips making cake"Once the state made it clear they were coming after Jack again," Phillips told the radio program, "Jack had no choice but to go into federal court, and ask the federal court to help him and to prevent the state from continuing to target and harass him."

Last week, a federal court refused the state's request to dismiss Phillips' lawsuit

"The federal court found that there is sufficient evidence that what the state was doing was acting in bad faith towards Jack Phillips," said Campbell. "So that's a really good sign for us."

It's unknown if the court will also side with Phillips in coming months, the attorney said, but it's a good sign that the lawsuit can proceed.

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