Judges uphold 'gender identity' over basic morality

Tuesday, June 5, 2018
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

locker room 3Parents in Pennsylvania are being warned about the potential fallout from a federal court decision upholding a controversial school policy that essentially forces students who are uncomfortable undressing in front of the opposite sex to simply "tolerate it."

Late last month, a federal court ruled against the concerns of parents by defending a Pennsylvania school policy that allows transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms of the gender with which they identify. On May 24, the three-judge panel of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals – after about 15 minutes of deliberation – sided unanimously with Boyertown Area School District officials and upheld the controversial policy that was implemented in September 2016.

Diane Gramley of the American Family Association of Pennsylvania says the policy isn't in the best interest of transgender students. "The school district is not doing these students any favors by allowing them to continue in their confused state," she argues. "They need to address the causes behind their confusion."

The Independence Law Center, in conjunction with Alliance Defending Freedom, took the district to court over the policy after a young male student in the boys' locker room saw a girl [a transgender boy] stripped down to her bra. Upon taking their concerns to the principal, he and several other boys were instructed to "tolerate it" and make it "natural."

Because the appeals court now has allowed this policy to continue at Boyertown, Gramley warns parents across the state to be wary.

Gramley, Diane (AFA of Pennsylvania)"My fear is that more schools in Pennsylvania are going to going to actually pass either a written or unwritten policy that would allow boys in girls' bathrooms, lockers, and shower rooms," she tells OneNewsNow. "So parents need to be vigilant, especially during the summer."

According to The Morning Call, Alliance Defending Freedom lawyers defending the plaintiffs who challenged the policy say they will petition the court to rehear their appeal before a larger panel of judges.

Earlier stories:

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