'Unthinkable' for gov't to force free advertising for abortuaries

Tuesday, November 14, 2017
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel brown 620x300The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case that a Christian legal group argues the Ninth Circuit got wrong.

In 2015, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the Reproductive FACT Act. That law forces pro-life pregnancy centers to post signs and include in advertising that they don't provide abortions – and then list available abortion clinics as well as those that terminate babies free or at a discount price.

Kevin Theriot is an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom, which is handling the case. He tells OneNewsNow that it's certainly a matter of free speech guaranteed by the Constitution.

Theriot, Kevin (ADF)"Forcing anybody to provide free advertising for the abortion industry is just unthinkable. That's especially true when it's the government doing the forcing," says Theriot. "It's a big deal when it comes to pregnancy care centers, which exist specifically to care for women who want to have their babies."

ADF CEO Michael Farris contends the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals got it wrong when it upheld the California law. It's viewpoint discrimination, he says – and unconstitutional, according to longstanding Supreme Court doctrine.

"That's what made the decision [in the lower court] frankly so shocking," says Farris, "that the Ninth Circuit went out of its way, I think, to issue a decision that's out of sync with recognized law, both Supreme Court law and the law more focused kind of cases of other circuits." Three of those circuits have ruled similar laws unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it will hear the case, National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra.

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