Court: Deputies violated 4th Amendment rights

Friday, September 15, 2017
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with U.S. flagA legal organization is going to court to prove to Texas authorities that the U.S. Constitution isn't dead.

In December 2015, Gillespie County Sheriff's deputies arrived at the private home of Huntly and Susan Dantzler after receiving an unverified anonymous tip that someone they were looking for was at the home.

John Whitehead, founder of The Rutherford Institute, relates to OneNewsNow how the Texas couple told officers the suspect wasn't there, but deputies insisted on entering the home.

"Under the Fourth Amendment, which is the key principle here, a judge has to approve police officers charging into peoples' homes," explains Whitehead, "So the husband stepped forward and basically said he'd like to see a warrant."

Whitehead said the deputies immediately grabbed the husband, took him out on the front lawn, and slammed him face down, handcuffing him and cutting his wrists. His face was also bruised during the incident.

Whitehead, John (Rutherford Institute)Deputies then invaded the house only to find that, indeed, the man they were looking for was not there. The Rutherford Institute filed suit on behalf of the Dantzlers, alleging officers clearly violated the Constitution by not having a warrant.

In the latest phase of the Dantzlers' legal battle, the judge ruled their claim was viable and that police did indeed violate their Fourth Amendment rights.

"The government had moved to dismiss [the suit], believe it or not," says Whitehead, "Now we can move forward with this case and make sure that peoples' Fourth Amendment rights are going to be protected."

Whitehead hopes Texas sheriff's departments will learn that the constitutional rights of people cannot be violated, and the Constitution still applies.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWS BRIEF

FEATURED PODCAST

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Has your family experienced ‘distance learning’ instead of classroom instruction?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Barr: No evidence of fraud that’d change election outcome
Trump files lawsuit challenging Wisconsin election results
Barr appoints special counsel in Russia probe investigation
US panel to decide who should get the first COVID-19 shots
UK court rules against clinic in puberty blocking drugs case
Centrist lawmakers push $908B plan to break virus impasse
Nasdaq plan would force diversity on listed companies

LATEST FROM THE WEB

The president hasn't conceded, but secretly he's told advisers he wants to run again in 4 years
Amistad lawyer: FBI collecting data on vote fraud
Liberals pounce after Dr. Scott Atlas resigns as special coronavirus adviser to the president
The 'smartest man in the room' has joined Sidney Powell's team
Reasons why the 2020 presidential election is deeply puzzling

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Atheists winning, so far, over Pensacola cross

Pensecola crossA law firm that defends religious expression is fighting on behalf of the City of Pensacola and a public park cross.