'You will print my t-shirt!' Business owner will tell judge today why he can't

Friday, March 13, 2015
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

The owner of a printing company in Kentucky is scheduled to stand before a judge today and demand the right to live out his religious beliefs in the workplace.

Blain Adamson, owner of Hands On Originals, found himself in trouble in 2012 when he refused to print T-shirts promoting the Lexington Pride Festival (see video below), a homosexual event sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization.

Adamson didn't want to be responsible for the message the shirts would convey and offered to connect the group with another printer who would accept the job and at the same price. But like other business owners who have tried to compromise, it didn't work. A complaint was filed by the organization before the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission, alleging discrimination against homosexuals, and the commission found Adamson guilty.

After the commission ruled, Alliance Defending Freedom filed an appeal on behalf of Adamson in state court. Oral arguments are scheduled for today, March 13. 

Campbell, Jim (ADF)ADF attorney Jim Campbell says every American should be free to "live and work according to their faith" without a fear of punishment. 

"You see, our government was formed to be liberty's greatest protector, not its greatest threat," Campbell tells OneNewsNow. "But in this case, the government is coming after our client's liberty and his ability to make a living."

Adamson's fight to "discriminate" is similar to a growing list of small-business owners, such as florists and bakers, who run often afoul after cities and counties adapt "non-discrimination" rules. Those rules have repeatedly forced Christian business owners to choose between their livelihood and their religious beliefs, most often about marriage. 

In a 2014 story about Adamson, Campbell told The Blaze that the commission ordered Adamson to print any future t-shirts for the pride festival, and ordered him and his employees to undergo "diversity training." 

The attorney also told The Blaze that Adamson has fulfilled t-shirt orders for gays and lesbians in the past but he refused the pride festival order because of the message the t-shirts conveyed.

The business owner has turned down more than a dozen other orders since 2012, all because he objected to their content, Campell said. 

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