Parents: Your kids need you to push back on radical sex ed

Monday, March 15, 2021
 | 
Bob Kellogg, Jody Brown (OneNewsNow.com)

sex education (confusion for child)The Democratic governor of New Jersey has signed a radical sex-education bill into law, making it clear to a family values group there that the state's "progressive" leaders don't have the best interests of children in mind.

Last summer, the New Jersey Department of Education adopted new learning standards for health classes requiring schools to teach 13-year-old students explicit sexual acts. Now, beginning this fall, public schools will be teaching students as young as five about transgender identity and sexual orientation.

On March 1, Governor Phil Murphy signed Assembly Bill 4454 requiring "diversity and inclusion" lessons beginning in kindergarten:

"The instruction shall: (1) highlight and promote diversity, including economic diversity, equity, inclusion, tolerance, and belonging in connection with gender and sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, disabilities, and religious tolerance; (2) examine the impact that unconscious bias and economic disparities have at both an individual level and on society as a whole; and (3) encourage safe, welcoming, and inclusive environments for all students regardless of race or ethnicity, sexual and gender identities, mental and physical disabilities, and religious beliefs." (emphasis added)

Shawn Hyland is executive director of New Jersey Family Policy Council. He says concerned parents need to tell local school boards to push back on this.

Hyland

"They need to hear, at the local level, that … as elected officials in the school board they need to contact DOE of New Jersey and legislators and tell them these types of policies are causing harm in our communities," he tells One News Now.

He explains further his concern on the Council's website: "Students are being intimidated by peers and obligated by faculty to affirm a sexual ideology that contradicts their religious beliefs. Tragically, teenagers are labeled as transphobic as they are harassed on social media to conform to the approved sex beliefs of state government."

According to Hyland, the new law is causing more and more Garden State parents to begin homeschooling their children.

"One of the action items we have given parents … in light of Governor Murphy signing this law is to ask their pastor about starting a homeschool co-op at the local church during the week so parents and students can meet together," he explains.

Over a 45-day period before signing the bill, the governor received 19,000 emails opposing it. But despite that "widespread outrage and objection from parents, pastors, and legislators," says the Family Policy Council, Murphy still authorized the bill to become law.

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