Abolish prisons? CA already tried that

Thursday, December 12, 2019
 | 
Bob Kellogg, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com)

handcuffs in court (juvenile)Far-left university students have chosen a new target for their anger and activism: prisons.

Students at Brown University held a November “teach-in” named “Prison Abolition 101” that was led by “prison abolitionists” who are members of a student group called RailrRoad, The Brown Daily Herald reported.

“The end goal is to not have prisons as any form of incarceration,” a RailRoad member told attendees. “Punishment at any stage doesn’t guarantee any kind of growth.”

Brown, a historic Ivy League school of 10,200 students, is located in Providence, Rhode Island.

The story reported that Brown is being urged by the group to adopt “fair chance” hiring practices that would include criminal convictions as part of its non-discrimination policy and even commit to hiring former convicts.

Green

Derryck Green of Project 21 says the current push to literally get rid of prisons comes from a “misguided” idea of justice.

“I think it's an offshoot of the mass incarceration movement,” he observes. “And I truly think that it's ultimately a form of feeling good about yourselves when you're not actually doing good for your community or the country."

Green, who lives in California, says the state’s successful Prop 47 allowed the release of nonviolent criminals only to watch crime skyrocket. 

Voters passed the ballot measure in 2014 in a lopsided 59-40 percent vote, allowing criminals convicted of felonies for shoplifting, forgery, and drug possession, for example, to be considered misdemeanor crimes.

According to stories published in The Los Angeles Times and The Washington Post, politicians and law enforcement officials in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego have blamed Prop 47 for rising crime rates, drug offenders skipping their treatment programs, and clever criminals using the measure to avoid prosecution for crimes such as shoplifting.

prison yard scene"Statewide," reads an L.A. Times story from 2015, "property crime has increased in nine of California’s 10 largest cities this year, a Times review found. Violent crime has increased in all 10."

“Shockingly, to only those who didn't think this far in advance,” Green says, “property crime has gone up, physical assaults have gone up, robbery has gone up."

California voters will now vote in 2020 on toughening the state's criminal laws in a new referendum to roll back Prop 47.

The L.A. Times, after reporting on the spike in crimes, is now urging Californians to vote against the coming referendum vote.  

At Brown University, meanwhile, the students are pushing for a "world without prisons." 

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