Learning to hold true to scripture in an online night class

Tuesday, May 21, 2019
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Gordon College logoA historic Christian college is making drastic changes to its budget and staff numbers to keep its doors open in an age of compromise and competition.

Gordon College, located in Wenham, Massachusetts, plans to trim seven percent from its operating budget, and drop 13 faculty and 23 staff positions over the next two years.

The school of 2,000 students, currently located just north of Boston, was founded in 1889 to train Baptist missionaries.

Richard Land, president of North Carolina-based Southern Evangelical Seminary, says the school appears to be attempting to adapt to the Internet age of online studies and flexible class schedules. 

“All private colleges that don't have massive endowments,” he says, “are all facing the same issues.”

Gordon is eliminating some majors and integrating several others while at the same time it is using a $10 million anonymous gift to start “Gordon Global,” graduate and online offerings at the newly created School for Graduate, Professional, and Extended Studies.

Land says Southern Evangelical Seminary is headed in a similar direction: offering more online classes, livestreaming classes, and mostly night classes.

“So that people can work during the day and they can take the classes at night,” he explains, “and they can take them from anywhere in the world.”

Land, Dr. Richard (SBC, ERLC)The key to success for both schools, says Land, is knowing what legacies to keep and which ones to let go of.

Gordon College is known for its evangelical beliefs in a disapproving city that views them as discriminatory, and Boston officials have severed ties with Gordon in recent years over the college's orthodox views on marriage human sexuality. 

The college president, Michael Lindsay, has been under pressure to make the college more accepting while many parents would likely send their children elsewhwere if the school caves to the LGBT activists. 

“The schools that are going to survive are going to maintain commitment to their Christian heritage,” Land predicts, “and at the same time seek to offer their educational opportunities as broadly as possible and as accessibly as possible.”

 

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