District's new 'bathroom' policy bypassed parents

Thursday, May 12, 2016
 | 
Charlie Butts, Jody Brown (OneNewsNow.com)

Fort Worth ISD buildingThe latest transgender battleground is in the school system in Fort Worth, Texas, where the district's leadership is being accused of acting totally out of line with parental sentiment.

The district has implemented a policy allowing boys to visit girls' restrooms. Under that policy – announced last month by the superintendent – students have access to restrooms consistent with "the gender identity that each student consistently and uniformly asserts."

There has been such an outrage that Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick held a press conference covered by KXAS-TV in which he asked Dr. Kent Scribner, superintendent of Fort Worth Independent School District, to resign.

"The job of the superintendent is not to be a social engineer," said Patrick. "The job of superintendent is to prepare his students for a great education."

Scribner faces heavy criticism for the decision and has refused to step down, saying he's proud of the new guidelines. "I think they provide educators with the ability to make all students more comfortable and confident in a learning environment," he told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram editorial board.

Nicole Hudgens of Texas Values attended the lieutenant governor's press conference. She spoke with OneNewsNow afterwards.

Hudgens

"The superintendent and the board of trustees did not take a vote with the school board on this issue, nor did they let the parents have a say," she shares, suggesting that raises the question of transparency. She points out 82 percent of Ft. Worth residents are against the policy and want it changed.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton wrote a letter suggesting the school district had violated parental rights. School officials, however, say they are just complying with Title IX of federal education law.

Hudgens tells OneNewsNow the district – like U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch – is attempting to redefine the term "sex" in the law to include transgender. But only one entity that can add do that, says the state outreach coordinator for Texas Values.

"They're trying to act like Congress and redefine words, and they're not supposed to be doing that. They don't have the authority to do that," she states.

The board didn't take action after hearing testimony for and against the district's decision.

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