Tradition wins in war over TX textbooks

Tuesday, November 25, 2014
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

Critics who were trying to remove America's religious heritage from public school textbooks met their match when they went up against the Texas Board of Education. 

Opponents were trying to do away with Moses and the impact that the Ten Commandments and Judeo-Christian principles have had on American law, says Jonathan Saenz. 

Saenz, who leads pro-family group Texas Values, says those efforts were rejected by textbook publishers and the state Board of Education.

Saenz, Jonathan (Texas Values)"We're pleased that Texas students will now get to learn about our American religious heritage," he tells OneNewsNow, crediting the leadership of publishers and a majority of the board of education.

The decision to keep the Judeo-Christian references is important because, with about five million students in Texas, Texas has a huge impact on the national textbook market.

The New York Times, reporting on the textbooks, said the 10-5 vote by the board of education included all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed. The board approved 89 textbooks and other classroom materials. 

News website Politico reported that one civics texbook downplayed Jim Crow era segregation, and that affirmative action "takes a beating" in other textbooks, among other claims. 

An Associated Press story reported that Texas education officials say they are attempting to counter liberal bias in the classroom with the more conservative, traditional books. 

Saenz says opponents were not aiming at references to religion in general. But for some reason, he says, they singled out references to Moses and to Judeo-Christian principles. 

In fact, left-leaning websites are ridiculing the textbooks for claiming Moses as a "Founding Father" of the United States, though The New York Times claimed only that the books "overstated" the importance of Moses' influence on the Founding Fathers. 

A lengthy 2012 story on The Blaze website describes the parallels between the Old Testament nation of Israel and the founding of the United States. 

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