Tradition wins in war over TX textbooks

Tuesday, November 25, 2014
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

Critics who were trying to remove America's religious heritage from public school textbooks met their match when they went up against the Texas Board of Education. 

Opponents were trying to do away with Moses and the impact that the Ten Commandments and Judeo-Christian principles have had on American law, says Jonathan Saenz. 

Saenz, who leads pro-family group Texas Values, says those efforts were rejected by textbook publishers and the state Board of Education.

Saenz, Jonathan (Texas Values)"We're pleased that Texas students will now get to learn about our American religious heritage," he tells OneNewsNow, crediting the leadership of publishers and a majority of the board of education.

The decision to keep the Judeo-Christian references is important because, with about five million students in Texas, Texas has a huge impact on the national textbook market.

The New York Times, reporting on the textbooks, said the 10-5 vote by the board of education included all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed. The board approved 89 textbooks and other classroom materials. 

News website Politico reported that one civics texbook downplayed Jim Crow era segregation, and that affirmative action "takes a beating" in other textbooks, among other claims. 

An Associated Press story reported that Texas education officials say they are attempting to counter liberal bias in the classroom with the more conservative, traditional books. 

Saenz says opponents were not aiming at references to religion in general. But for some reason, he says, they singled out references to Moses and to Judeo-Christian principles. 

In fact, left-leaning websites are ridiculing the textbooks for claiming Moses as a "Founding Father" of the United States, though The New York Times claimed only that the books "overstated" the importance of Moses' influence on the Founding Fathers. 

A lengthy 2012 story on The Blaze website describes the parallels between the Old Testament nation of Israel and the founding of the United States. 

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What's your reaction to Trump's proposal to slash in half U.S. contributions to the U.N.?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Blaming conservatives, Trump signals new openness to Dems
Koppel says Hannity is 'bad for America'; Hannity fires back
Ellison says Dems must fight Republicans at all levels
Raiders to Las Vegas should happen Monday with little delay
Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains
Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions
1 dead, 15 injured in Cincinnati nightclub gunfight
Berkeley killing renews debate over gender pronouns

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Does Trump want Speaker Paul Ryan to resign?
Nunes 'peculiar midnight run' led to Trump surveillance presser
Colorado high school student murders: New arrests made, police say
Water, science and the Bible
WEX: GOP retreat from Obamacare repeal is biggest broken promise in political history

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Abstinence high school speaker ousted: Message called ‘hate speech’

Many public schools across the nation have regularly invited speakers from Planned Parenthood to inform high school and middle school students about under-age and premarital “safe sex” and how to use various forms of contraception, but when one abstinence speaker was scheduled to inform students in southeastern Pennsylvania about the rewards of saving sex until marriage and the dangers of casual sex, her speech was quickly cancelled, with critics calling it “hate speech.”