To abort or not … much more than a dollars-and-cents decision

Monday, April 12, 2021
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

hand with ultrasound wandA research associate with The Heritage Foundation is making the case that medical professionals can help reduce the number of abortions associated with problematic pregnancies.

Many medical professionals either recommend to patients or pressure them to have an abortion if there's a distressing prenatal diagnosis such as Down syndrome or a physical impairment, sometimes citing the cost of raising a child with an abnormality.

Melanie Israel is a research associate for The Heritage Foundation, serving in the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society. She points out that sometimes the diagnosis is correct,  - and sometimes not.

Israel

"Unfortunately, when parents are in this very, very vulnerable moment being faced with some sort of adverse diagnosis, they're not being given the full scope, the full picture of what their options are," Israel describes. "And some of that simply comes down to the fact that these doctors themselves don't know what those options are."

A recent article by LifeNews.com reports that 25% of doctors admit pressuring women to abort their unborn children following a distressing prenatal diagnosis:

"Not only must the mother face the possibility that her baby is in peril, but all too often she is subject to bullying, as the doctor to whom she has entrusted her body and her child attempts to push her toward abortion," writes Nora Sullivan.

Israel suggests it's time that physicians become educated on all the options, perhaps while they're in school or in training.

"[They] need to be doing the work to make sure that men and women know the full scope of options and support that is available to them, and not present these decisions purely in terms of dollars and cents because human dignity matters even more than those other factors," she argues.

Israel also suggests that federal or state health departments could develop information packets for doctors to hand to patients and post that information online along with available resources.

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