Warning: Accused will lose legal rights if Title IX reversed

Monday, January 4, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with U.S. flagIt appears a Joe Biden administration would change Title IX rules for colleges and universities that were put in place during the Trump administration, and a critic of such a change says it would harm the legal rights of young men who are accused of assault.  

Men accused of sexual assault on campuses often find themselves without an open legal process to hire an attorney, and cross-examine the accuser and defend themselves, and that legal shortcoming was noticed by Education Secretary Betsy Devos.  

According to Ashe Schow, editor and writer at The Daily Wire, Secretary DeVos became aware of the legal issue. She then talked directly to women who said they were assaulted and also talked to the men who stood accused of a crime.  

"[DeVos] came to the decision,” Schow tells One News Now, “that schools were not handling this issue properly.”

The issue is a familiar topic for Schow. She raised the issue of a lopsided legal process while an op-ed writer at The Washington Examiner newspaper, where she alerted the public to campuses where the accuser often finds himself forced to prove his innocence.

After the education secretary looked into the issue, new Title IX rules were put in place last summer by the Dept. of Education to "protect students from sexual misconduct and restore fairness and due process to our campuses."

NBC News sees things differently. Citing victims’ advocates, the peacock network reports the Trump administration sided with those accused of misconduct instead of their accusers. So there is a push under way to return to the Obama administration’s view of Title IX rules.

If you ask Schow, the Obama administration and college campuses sided with accusers, often with little to no evidence, to the point that a college administration was not required to inform the alleged perpetrator of the specific allegation against him.  

“They were not required to provide the evidence against the accused student so that he knew what to fight back against,” she complains. “They were not allowing cross-examination of the accuser, or the witnesses, or the evidence against him. They were not allowing any of these things.”

Schow points out that when Joe Biden was accused in 2019 of sexual assault dating back to 1993, he expected people to believe he was innocent.

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