Courage, duty, honor on a dangerous Nashville street

Tuesday, December 29, 2020
 | 
Billy Davis, Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Nashville PD camera footageMinutes before an RV-turned-street-bomb blew up on a Nashville street, a police officer’s body camera was recording brave NPD officers evacuating the public and calmly preparing for an explosion.

The body camera worn on Christmas Day by Officer Michael Sipos shows approximately 13 minutes of footage, beginning with officers responding to the eerie “evacuate now” message coming from the RV and the suspected bomber, Anthony Quinn Warner.

The body cam footage, released Monday by the Nashville Police Dept., can be viewed here.

After evacuating nearby buildings, Officer Sipos is shown donning heavier protective gear from his police cruiser when the RV explodes nearby.

“I actually popped my trunk to get a piece of equipment out,” Sipos told the media, “and I felt a push and was thrown into the trunk a little bit, and turned around to see a very orange sky and a lot of smoke."

The bomber was killed in the explosion, the only fatality, and three others were injured.

The responding officers have said they evacuated about seven families before the explosion.

In addition to Sipos, the names of the responding officers are Brenna Hosey, James Luellen, Amanda Topping, James Wells, and Sgt. Timothy Miller.

“This reveals that law enforcement is literally on the front lines of terrorism,” observes Randy Sutton, a police advocate who leads the Law Enforcement News Network. “The first responders, they are the people that are on the line. They’re the ones who are risking their lives every single day.”

The camera footage revealed that police officers arrived on 2nd Street and soon realized they were facing a bomb.

“That building that it’s next to,” one police officer tells another, “is the building that houses all the hardlines for phones throughout the Southeast.”

“Makes sense,” a second officer coolly replies. “Good spot to put a bomb.”

Faced with a street bombing, the responding officers made a “conscience choice” to put their own lives in danger to save others, Sutton says.

“That is bravery,” he says. “It is courage. It is duty and it is honor.”

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