Police chiefs walking away over budget cuts, left-wing hate

Thursday, September 10, 2020
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Seattle Police Chief Carmen BestIn a scene that is repeating itself across the country, police chiefs are standing in front of a microphone and telling the public, the media, and police-hating politicians they have had enough.

The major cities of Seattle, Atlanta, Portland, Dallas, and Rochester, New York are all looking for a new police chief after the top cop stepped down.

In the most recent incident, most of the upper ranks at the Rochester Police Department retired early, or gave up their commissions, after police were accused of suffocating a black man, Daniel Prude. He was held down by police and detained with a “spit hood” in March after running nude through the street and acting erratically while high on PCP. 

Randy Sutton of The Wounded Blue says it is inevitable that police chiefs are throwing their hands up and walking away.  

“And it's certainly understandable,” he says, “because you have increasing political interference in active investigations, which very often dehumanize and demonize the police.”

Perhaps the most prominent walk-off occurred in Seattle, where Chief Carmen Best (pictured at top) quit after the city council voted 6-3 to slash her salary by 40 percent. In a city besieged by riots, Seattle’s first black chief, a 28-year veteran of SPD, watched the city council vote to slash the police department budget by $4 million, which would reduce the police force by as many as 100 officers.

“I definitely think it’s personal,” she said of the budget-slashing vote.

BLM protest in Pittsburgh June 2020A blistering op-ed by a Seattle Times columnist pointed the finger at Kshama Sawant, a far-left city council member. She suggested cutting Best’s salary and command staff, too, minutes before a budget meeting was set to start. The city council voted in favor of the salary with little discussion after the last-minute addition.

Columnist Danny Westneat pointed out Swant has openly called for abolishing the police department and called for a “revolution” to overthrow capitalism.

“This is all about politics. This has nothing to do with race,” Sutton tells OneNewsNow. “Even when the police officers that are involved in these controversial uses of force are black, they're still calling it racism.”

In a Sept. 9 story, USA Today compiled a list of police chiefs who have retired or quit around the country. 

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