Minus a spiritual revival, say adios to patriotism: apologist

Tuesday, August 4, 2020
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

church in AmericaFor the first time ever, a majority of the American population is under 40 years old. What could that mean for the future of the country?

Millennials and Gen Z make up 50.7% of the U.S. population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That means their "progressive" priorities on issues like immigration, the environment, sexuality, abortion and the like are on the rise – and portend a marked move toward the left and away from biblical values.

Dr. Alex McFarland of Truth for a New Generation says it will take a spiritual revival to recover a traditional or conservative majority on any of those issues.

"I don't think there'll be a return to patriotism and the stewardship of the country unless there's a great move of God," the Christian apologist tells OneNewsNow. "Apart from a massive move of the Holy Spirit, I'm not hopeful that there's going to be a renaissance of patriotism."

McFarland

He says even the gospel will be facing a significant headwind in the days to come.

"What does make it tenuous for the spreading of the gospel – and for our freedoms – is that this generation is really the first majority-young adult demographic that has spent its entire life in a culture of militant secularism," he observes.

McFarland points out that most of the "new majority" attended public school – not private school or homeschool – and has never lived in a time when the Church in America was really robust. Instead, says the Bible scholar, they've lived in an age he calls the megachurch church-lite.

"They've heard America being bashed for their 18 to 29 years of life, so unless God intervenes with a resurgence of the gospel and of patriotism – by the time they're elderly, if the world even is around for that long, America will have been a distant memory," he laments.

As reported by AP, millennials typically are defined as being born between 1981 and 1996. Members of Generation Z were born after 1996.

Baby boomers, long considered a primary driver of demographic and social change in the U.S. because of their large numbers, were born between the end of World War II and the arrival of the Beatles in the U.S. in 1964.

Squeezed between the boomers and millennials, Generation Xers were born in the late 1960s and 1970s.

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