Human rights, and the human fight, for freedom

Wednesday, February 12, 2020
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Declaration of IndependenceA former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission says the never-ending battles for smaller government over big, individual liberty over tyranny, and capitalism over socialism, are all wrapped in one central struggle: Mankind wants to be free.

The United States is unique in history because of its form of government, says Ken Blackwell, and the reason is written into our Declaration of Independence.

“We are the most diverse, the most prosperous constitutional republic, in all of human history,” he tells OneNewsNow. “It's because we actually believe that our human rights are not grants from government but gifts from God.”

Blackwell

That is a reference to the Declaration affirming mankind’s “inalienable rights,” meaning rights from our Creator that cannot be surrendered or traded, and Blackwell says that wording changes the game because those rights are connected to God and secured by the U.S. Constitution.

“Anytime a people, a culture, a state wants to make government more powerful,” Blackwell warns, "they do that at the expense of individual liberty.”

Blackwell, 71, has enjoyed a varied career that ranged from Ohio’s secretary of state to the ambassador post with the Human Rights Commission. He says the biggest struggle at the moment is the fight for religious freedom.

First Amendment Monument (Philadelphia)“And at the heart of individual liberty,” he says, “is the freedom of conscience: the ability to practice one's faith in the public square, not just have that practice relegated to the four corners of the church.”

According to Blackwell, it’s impossible to discuss religious liberty without commenting about President Donald Trump and his administration, who are being credited – and criticized – for coming to the defense of Catholic nuns, faith-based adoption agencies, and denouncing religious persecution around the world.

“You have Donald Trump who wants to put a harness on government to optimize individual liberty,” Blackwell observes, “and you have the progressives who want to grow government because they believe that government is the best arbiter of what is good for us.”

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Do you feel restrictions on the size of gatherings are being unfairly applied to churches?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Trump tempers officials' grave assessments with optimism
  Debate heats up over using an anti-malaria drug for COVID-19
Stocks rise sharply on hopes of progress in battling virus
Tiger at NYC's Bronx Zoo tests positive for coronavirus
Justices rule for federal employee over age discrimination

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Welcome to the police state: Police give woman $200 ticket for going for a drive amid stay-at-home order
COVID-19 and the politics of fear and panic
Med prof: There are ‘major problems’ with current coronavirus mortality estimates
US forced into unthinkable gamble with livelihoods
Sheriff rebels against governor: 'We will not be setting up a police state'

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Lies: Drag queen readers not screened for 'story hour'

Chula Vista websiteBusted: That’s the claim from a watchdog group about public officials who are accused of lying to the public about running a background check on drag queens who read to children at a California public library.