City abandons ordinance that court said discriminated against women

Wednesday, September 25, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

judge banging gavelA college town in Colorado has ended its topless ban. The decision by the city of Fort Collins comes after the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in February that the law discriminated against women.

"The case was brought under the equal rights amendment of Colorado, which is basically an equality of the sexes, saying Colorado is not going to discriminate between people on account of sex," says Brad Bergford, chief executive officer of Colorado Family Action and CFA Foundation. "They also brought inequal protection claim and they sued on free speech grounds as well. So there was a three-pronged approach – and from a legal standpoint, the holding really doesn't make a whole lot of sense."

Why not?

Bergford

"When the 10th Circuit Court of appeals ruled on this, the court said it was left as the district court was to suspect that the city's professed interest in protecting women and children derives not from any morphological differences between men's and women's breasts but from negative stereotypes depicting women's breasts – but not men's breasts – as sex objects."

Bergford adds that he doesn't know how a public display of what judges say are "sex objects" in society would change any stereotypes that exist or don't exist with respect to those body parts.

"It just doesn't make sense on a legal basis," he reiterates. "Now, one thing that the 10th Circuit did point out is that Denver and Boulder also offer the freedom for women to parade about without shirts on, so there is a bigger problem than just what's going on in Fort Collins, Colorado."

As a result, Bergford says this is appearing to be more systemic than what many people might have thought.

"The Church needs to stand up and say there are boundaries that need to be set so that we can all behave according to our real convictions, according to our marriage covenants, without creating problems with each other," Bergford believes.

"This goes far beyond the concepts of 'let each person live as he or she will' and 'let people do what they want to do in the privacy of their own homes,' because it was never in the interest of the sexual revolution people for their sexual revolution to remain private. They always wanted it to be public – and that really encroaches on our religious liberties."

See related story from Fox News

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