Ohio resolution addresses 'proliferation of porn'

Monday, July 8, 2019
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

no porn symbolAnother state could soon be added to the list of states that have declared pornography "a public health hazard."

OneNewsNow spoke with Ohio Republican State Representative Jena Powell, who has introduced a resolution that declares pornography a public health hazard "with statewide and national public health impacts leading to a broad spectrum of individual and societal harms." Pornography is a "threat to our culture," she states.

"When it comes to pornography, … people believe they can view pornography and it has no impact on their community or their state," says Powell. "And when we look at the statistics, we see a rise in sex trafficking [and] a rise in the abuse of women and children."

Ohio is in the top five states for human sex trafficking – and House Resolution 180, as introduced, confronts that issue by encouraging education, prevention, research, and policy changes at both the community and societal levels. The pornography industry, Powell laments, begins grooming children early.

Powell

"Children are starting to look at pornography between the ages of 7 and 11 years old. That is completely uncalled for and inappropriate and we want to do what we can because it does become an addiction."

The Republican lawmaker's resolution also urges enforcement of obscenity laws and increased regulation of pornography to protect individuals – "minors in particular" – from exposure.

Powell adds that support for the resolution has been "really incredible" and is growing rapidly.

"We have received a lot of co-sponsor requests and [we've heard from] a lot of non-profits in our state and around the United States that have been calling in [and] are on board and [are saying] Enough is enough," she shares. "We're tired of the exploitation of women and children throughout society."

Fifteen other states have passed similar resolutions declaring pornography a public health crisis. And while the resolutions do not have the force of law, they often carry great influence on legislators.

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