Attorney: Mandating vaccines 'designed to scare people'

Wednesday, April 10, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

getting a vaccination vaccine injectionPeople in a certain part of New York City are being told to get the measles vaccine – but an attorney in the Big Apple known for her legal work involving vaccination rights calls it "pharma-generated hysteria."

As of now, the measles vaccine mandate involves every adult and child who lives, works, or resides in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg and has not received the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to be vaccinated.

"People who demonstrate they are immune from measles or should be medically exempt from this requirement will not need to get vaccinated," the NYC Health Department says on its website. "If the Health Department identifies a person with measles or an unvaccinated child exposed to measles in Williamsburg, that individual or their parent or guardian could be fined $1,000."

As of April 8, 2019, there have been 285 confirmed cases of measles in Brooklyn and Queens since October. According to the Health Department, most of these cases have involved members of the Orthodox Jewish community.

Finn

"This is crazy," states New York-based attorney Patricia Finn, aka The Good Health Lawyer. "It's out of control, it's pharma-generated hysteria, and it's designed to scare people and public officials into mandating vaccines that are likely the cause of the outbreaks."

Finn plans to file a lawsuit to stop this mandate. She recently did that in Rockland County, New York, when the local government wanted to bar unvaccinated minors from most public places. A state judge has since ruled in Finn's favor.

"I represent a lot of people in New York City, and they're really afraid," Finn says about the mandate. "There are vaccines that are not tested for safety and they're being forced on people and kids are getting hurt. The vaccine court has awarded $4 billion in damages in vaccine injuries, so we know there are injuries."

Individuals and organizations in favor of vaccines say they are necessary to protect babies, the elderly, and people with health conditions that may not take to a vaccination. Also, OneNewsNow has been told that vaccines are not 100-percent effective, so even those who have received vaccines can get sick if they are among a percentage of people where the vaccine did not work.

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