'Non-binary, genderfluid' Hoosiers recognized by 'X'

Thursday, March 14, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com)

police officer issuing ticketIndiana has joined other states in offering a make-believe gender option on driver's licenses and identification cards. 

In addition to "M" for male and "F" for female, Hoosiers can now choose a non-binary option designated by an "X."

“Non-binary” is a person who claims to be a gender other than male and female, such as the 31 genders recognized by New York City, or they can be somewhere in between a man and a woman.

Cosmopolitan magazine seemingly explained in a 2018 story on gender that a "non-binary" person can be "trans, genderfluid, genderqueer, and non-binary all at the same time."

Micah Clark of American Family Association of Indiana says one reason people are upset over the “X” designation is not just because it’s a far-left idea being embraced by their state. 

A second reason is the state government has tightened the security to obtain a license, he says, and now Hoosiers must now bring “all sorts” of identification to prove their identity.

“But now people can claim that their gender is something they make up,” he adds. “So it seems like a step backward."

List of gendersYet the move was predictably applauded by groups such as the ACLU, which told The Indiana Star that non-binary people can now “affirm who they are," which according to multiple sources can be literally anything they dream up.

HRC, the powerful homosexual-lobbying group, defines non-binary as "being both a man and a woman, somewhere in between, or as falling completely outside these categories."

Many non-binary people identify as transgender --- but not all do, the supposed definition also stated.  

The same Star news story quoted three groups applauding the “surprise” decision but didn’t include any criticism of the decision.

gender confusion 2Indiana is now the sixth state to offer another gender option on drivers licenses and or I.D. cards.

"It makes you wonder what's next," Clark observes.

The conservative activist suggests that Hoosiers who oppose the “X” allowance should contact the governor’s office to complain, since the change was made by an executive agency.

“A person can dress up or live the lifestyle they want to,” he tells OneNewsNow, “but they need to declare on their driver's license for the sake of police officers and other people what their gender truly is."

 

 

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