Will Utah's pro-life Down Syndrome bill survive?

Tuesday, February 6, 2018
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

baby feetUtah lawmakers are considering legislation that is aimed at ending discrimination against a class of people who are currently unprotected.

The Down Syndrome Non-Discrimination Abortion Act was introduced by Karianne Lisonbee – a house wife elected as a state representative.

Lisonbee told OneNewsNow that the bill would make it illegal for a doctor to perform an abortion on a woman solely because of a diagnosis of Down Syndrome – an offense that would be punishable by a maximum of one year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

“The bill also adds language that helps the doctor-patient conversation,” the congresswoman from Utah pointed out. “We've heard from so many of our families with children who have Down Syndrome that the doctor-patient conversation often – almost immediately – goes to termination of the baby when the baby has been diagnosed.”

A one-sided conversation advocating abortion is typical when pregnant mothers carry a child with the genetic disorder.

“The families suggest they haven't been given unbiased information to make a well-informed decision, so the bill requires physicians to give parents a referral to Down Syndrome support or advocacy groups and [a] referral to medical professionals who specialize in care for the Down Syndrome,” Lisonbee continued. “Abortion advocates claim the bill would restrict a woman's right to choose.”

The pro-life advocate insists that the pro-abortion activists’ push to abort preborn children with Down Syndrome is nothing short of cruel and evil.

“And my idea is it's salacious,” Lisonbee expressed. “This was a wanted baby until the diagnosis, and so this is not about taking away a woman's right to choose abortion; this is about discrimination – a message about a group of people who we have data to show are being discriminated against in our country.”

The chief complaint by abortionists is that if the pro-life Down Syndrome bill becomes law, it will lead to an expensive lawsuit – just as it has in North Dakota, Ohio, Louisiana and Indiana.

The Utah bill has passed out of committee and is now heading to the House floor.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Bottom line: What's the REAL reason Democrats' are so adamant about blocking Kavanaugh's confirmation?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Trump wants to rid Justice Department of 'lingering stench'
Gunmen attack Iran military parade, killing at least 24
Committee gives Kavanaugh accuser more time
Survivor found inside capsized Tanzania ferry; toll hits 167
GOP, Kavanaugh accuser in standoff over her Senate testimony
Cruz, O'Rourke trade attacks during testy 1st Texas debate
When will it end? Florence's floodwaters rising in Carolinas

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Grassley grants Kavanaugh accuser another extension
UK leader May hits back on Brexit plan; Pound falls
Schumer rallies behind Rosenstein, warns Trump not to fire him
Rosenstein reportedly discussed wearing 'wire,' invoking 25th Amendment against Trump
OH-Sen: Sherrod Brown says he's 'not close' to wanting to run for president in 2020

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
A campaign for heart control

elementary schoolWe put messages before our students all the time expecting it to make a difference. Now, one pro-family organization is wanting to add another one that listeners are all familiar with.