'Dreamers' a misnomer, says Christian educator

Monday, September 25, 2017
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

ICE arrestsA Christian apologist is weighing in on use of the word "dreamers" to describe people who are in the U.S. illegally and who have, in essence, broken the law.

President Trump has taken heat from conservative members of his own party for working with Democrats Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer to find a solution to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program – a program put in place by former President Barack Obama without congressional approval.

Trump has called for an end to DACA, but has tasked Congress with creating a solution for what to do with "Dreamers" – individuals now living in the United States because they accompanied their parents when they entered the country illegally.

Dr. Alex McFarland is a Christian apologist and director for Christian Worldview and Apologetics at North Greenville University in South Carolina. The term "dreamer," he says, obscures the truth and should not be used.

McFarland

"We've got to remember that we're talking about people who have skirted the law, either intentionally or by virtue of being part of a family," he tells OneNewsNow. "We need to use the word 'felon' [instead] because people who break the law – especially invading a country without going through the channels – they need to be helped to understand that we do not have open borders."

When justice is applied selectively, it overrides the rule of law, McFarland adds. "The real dreamers are those who work hard and pay taxes and dream about politicians who will govern justly," he states.

The "bottom line," McFarland argues, is that those who are in the country illegally should be deported.

"We need to look after the interests of American citizens," he continues. "It has to be carried out in the responsible, orderly, consistent, 'justice is blind' manner that it was done up until liberal progressives got a hold of the destiny of the nation."

McFarland says rather than cave to pressure, protests, or emotions, the nation's leaders must do the right thing even though it's hard – and knowing that the easy thing is often not the right thing.

McFarland is co-host of "Exploring the Word" on American Family Radio.

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