Veto, veto, veto: The gov's modus operandi

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe of VA (signing)Consistent with his previous actions, Virginia's governor has taken another step to silence those who believe in natural marriage.

On Thursday, Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe vetoed two bills that are designed to protect people and religious organizations that believe in biblical, one man/one woman marriage. In rejecting SB 2314 and HB 2025, the governor said not only are the measures essentially "discrimination under the guise of religious freedom," but they're also "bad for business" in the state.

Victoria Cobb of the Family Foundation of Virginia says McAuliffe's actions are having a chilling effect on the state's religious community.

"Although there's disagreement over cultural issues, we believe that protecting the right to dissent on issues of religious freedom – protecting that ability to speak out and dissent and to act out in dissent – is essential," she tells OneNewsNow.

Cobb, Virginia (Family Foundation - Virginia)According to Cobb, the veto wasn't a big surprise. McAuliffe previously issued an executive order barring the state from doing business with those who object to the homosexual lifestyle. He argued that the legislation implied the state was "more concerned with demonizing people than with creating a strong business climate" and would discourage job creators from locating in the commonwealth.

"He said [the state was] no longer going to contract with them," says Cobb, adding that "the concern we have is this attempt to sort of isolate these organizations; and we need to remember that charitable religious organizations make up a tremendous amount of the work that is done in our communities."

She lists among those services disaster relief, assisting the poor, and making arrangements for adoptions.

And as for the governor's "demonizing" remark? "The governor, of course, is all too comfortable with demonizing anyone who happens to disagree with him," Cobb offers.

Governor McAuliffe set a record last week for the most vetoes in state history. A veto session will begin April 5 with the objective of overturning these latest rejections. The Family Foundation will work to overturn the veto, although Cobb admits she isn't certain at this point that there are enough votes to restore religious freedom.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

$15/hour minimum wage – good for the economy or bad for the economy?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Iran's seizure of UK tanker in Gulf seen as escalation
Suspect in Japan anime studio arson reportedly had grudge
Besieged Puerto Rico governor goes quiet amid protests
Biden's son Hunter makes his 1st 2020 campaign appearance
Service resuming after 7 New York City subway lines stopped
US expands 'Remain in Mexico' policy
Oklahoma man accused of raping child in McDonald's bathroom
2020 Dems grapple with how to pay for 'Medicare for All'

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Michelle Obama seemingly swipes at Trump amid 'send her back' controversy
Liz Warren is stunned when a voter confronts her for claiming Native American heritage
Dems' border crisis hypocrisy exposed
Rachel Dolezal: Driven to blackface by anti-white racism
Forgiving student debt is a terrible idea

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
A silver lining in the NC 'bathroom bill' repeal?

North Carolina restroom issueThose who called for the repeal of North Carolina's "bathroom bill" got what they wanted yesterday - and still, says pro-family leader Tony Perkins, they're "absolutely livid" because it didn't go far enough.