Roanoke shooter was obsessed with race

Monday, August 31, 2015
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

A conservative black activist alleges that black victimization played a role in the murder of a white Virginia TV news reporter and a cameraman. 

More information is coming to light about Vester Flanagan, the disgruntled former employee of a Virginia news station who killed two people and blamed his woes on supposed racist whites.

"Here's a guy who's a classic black victim," observes Joe Hicks, a political commentary and member of Project 21.

Flanagan was a "failed" TV news reporter who got fired from numerous stations, notes Hicks, "and everywhere the guy went he was claiming he was a victim of racism (and) discrimination."

Flanagan shot and killed news reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward during a live broadcast. He shot himself hours later during a police pursuit and died at a hospital.

After shooting Parker, Flanagan used Twitter to claim Parker of making racist comments.

A former co-worker told The New York Post that Flanagan was obsessed with race to the point that he believed the journalism term "out in the field" was referring to blacks working in cotton fields.

The term means a reporter is away from the station on assignment.

Hicks

Flanagan cited that term in an unsuccessful discrimination lawsuit against the television station.

According to The Associated Press, Flanagan's hair-trigger temper became evident at least 15 years ago at WTWC-TV in Tallahassee, Florida.

Don Shafer, who hired him in 1999, said he had conflicts with co-workers "to the point where he was threatening people."

Flanagan also penned a 23-page "manifesto" in which he said he wanted to start a "race" war. 

Hicks says he's not surprised there's been no outcry over this black-on-white crime that killed two innocent white people.

"Leftism requires widespread perception of victimhood," Ben Shapiro wrote at Breitbart.com, referring to Flanagan. "Because without that perception of victimhood, no government corrective would be required." 

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