Vanderbilt professor describes treatment after 'hate speech' column

Monday, February 23, 2015
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

A law professor at Vanderbilt University says she is fearful after writing a column that criticized Islam. 

After the terrorist attack at the Paris newspaper Charlie Hebdo, Dr. Carol Swain wrote a column in The Tennessean entitled, "Charlie Hebdo attacks prove critics were right about Islam."

But when the commentary was published on January 15, Muslim students at Vanderbilt called Swain's column "hate speech" and held a protest on campus. 

Swain

Swain, who is black and a born-again Christian, was a recent guest on American Family Radio's "Focal Point" program.

"It's okay to attack Christians. It's okay to attack Jews," Swain observed on the radio program. "And so it's open season, I think, on both groups."

Vanderbilt, located in Nashville, has a student population of approximately 12,000 students. 

Swain's commentary, which can be read here, reads in part:

More and more members of the PC crowd now acknowledge that Islam has absolutely nothing in common with Christianity, nor is it a worthy part of the brotherhood of man I long felt was characteristic of the Abrahamic religions. 

The law professor also spends a good portion of the commentary defending Andrew Miller, Jr., who survived the 2001 terrorist attack in New York City and today is a vocal critic of radical Islam and its danger to the West.

Swain, who teaches political science and law, says there are Jewish faculty and students at Vanderbilt who engage in "self-hatred" by joining the protests against the professor.

The campus climate is so bad, she says, that she doesn't feel safe walking on campus after enduring harassment.

"And it's very sad to me that they talk about tolerance, diversity, and inclusiveness. It runs one way," she said. "And the attacks that have been allowed against me would never have happened to a black liberal or any other minority."

The report of the protest by The Tennessean is headlined, "Vanderbilt students rally against hate speech," referring to the professor's commentary, without any quotes around the words "hate speech." 

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