Apologist: Prof's 'devotion' evidence race has become an idol

Monday, April 12, 2021
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

'Weary Black Woman' devotionA progressive professor at a university founded by Baptists has penned what she calls a "devotional" in which she prays to God to help her "hate" white people.

Chanequa Walker-Barnes, Ph.D. is a professor of practical theology at Georgia's Mercer University, which was founded by Baptists almost two centuries ago but has since grown secular roots. The professor contributed to a devotional book called "A Rhythm of Prayer." The book contains her "Prayer of a Weary Black Woman," which starts with the lines:

"Dear God, please help me to hate white people. Or at least to want to hate them."

It continues:

"At least, I want to stop caring about them, individually and collectively. I want to stop caring about their misguided, racist souls, to stop believing that they can be better, that they can stop being racist."

(Click on image above for larger version)

In the devotion, Walker-Barnes cites as heroic the hatred of Jonah toward the Ninevites and the indifference of Lot toward Sodom. And to be clear, Walker-Barnes doesn't request help in hating all white people – but only the "nice ones." Her special condemnation goes toward the "Fox News-loving, Trump-supporting voters."

Dr. Alex McFarland, a Christian apologist, contends that Mercer needs to do some soul-searching.

McFarland

"Mercer was founded by the Baptists in 1833, and if they have one thread, one shred of common sense and fidelity to God's Word, this 'professor' – quote, unquote – should be fired," he tells One News Now.

"Notice it doesn't say 'hate racist white people' – although that in itself would be bad," McFarland continues, "because if you're a follower of the true and living God, you can't hate anybody."

The professor's prayer, argues the author and apologist, is the logical extension of Critical Race Theory.

"Race has become an idol to many black Americans," he states. "[Many of them promote] the idea that every white person is a racist, [and argue] I'm due all these special rights, and I'm a victim and let's slash and burn America. [These attitudes about] race and wokeness and social justice – even for some Christian blacks – has become an idol."

According to her website, Walker-Barnes is an "ecumenical minister whose work focuses upon healing the legacies of racial and gender oppression" – and whose faith "has been shaped by Methodist, Baptist, and evangelical social justice communities as well as by Buddhism and Islam."

One News Now reached out to both Mercer University and Dr. Walker-Barnes but did not hear back.

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