Pastor: Contrary to poll, most Bible-believing blacks oppose abortion

Friday, January 3, 2020
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

pregnant African-American womanA new poll finds that when it comes to opposing abortion, white evangelicals stand out from the rest of Americans who claim a faith. But a cultural analyst says those statistics are missing a key part of the population.

According to the AP/NORC poll, roughly two-thirds of white evangelical Protestants support significant restrictions on abortion. That compares with only 39 percent of white mainline Protestants and 33 percent of "nonwhite" Protestants. But Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson, founder of the conservative Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny (BOND), says one cannot lump all nonwhite Protestants together.

"They probably talked to people like Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and the Congressional Black Caucus," he suggests. "Those people don't represent the real black people."

Peterson says a healthy and growing population of socially conservative blacks are pro-life for the same reason white evangelicals are: "A lot of black people would tell you that they are Christians, and there's some things that they have not totally caved into. And I believe that most black people are against abortion."

Peterson

"I run into a lot of blacks and so far, most of them are pro-life – they're not for abortion," he testifies.

The pastor, author, and talk-show host contends that a movement afoot in the African-American community has a lot of them changing allegiances.

"This so-called 'leadership' thing, it's starting to fall apart," he says, referring to individuals like Jackson and Sharpton. "The liberal blacks don't have as much control over the hearts and minds and the way the blacks think anymore."

Peterson's book SCAM: How the Black Leadership Exploits Black America documents what he calls "the fraud and wickedness of false leaders" like Jackson, Sharpton, Louis Farrakhan, Maxine Waters, the NAACP, and the Congressional Black Caucus.

As for the AP/NORC poll, Peterson says he learned not to put too much stock into them since the 2016 presidential election.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What's behind the leftward-drift among major Protestant denominations in America?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Eleven US troops flown to medical centers after Iran strike
Virginia's highest court upholds weapons ban at gun rally
Rollback proposed for Michelle Obama school lunch guidelines
Iowa Democrats treat Warren-Sanders dust-up as 'Who cares?'
California teachers sue after jetliner dumps fuel on schools
Trump's impeachment trial begins, senators vowing 'impartial justice'
Dershowitz, Starr on Trump impeachment legal team

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump honors national champion LSU Tigers at White House
Iran's Supreme Leader calls Trump a 'clown' during first sermon in eight years, and he just fired back in a tweet
Rand Paul warns Republicans could block witnesses for Trump
Is threat of suicide bombings against Americans in Middle East imminent?
Did CNN finally push its biases too far for the American people?

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Methodists not the only ones deviating from Scripture

house built on sandThe United Methodist Church is splitting over an internal compromise on a biblical definition of sexuality. But one Christian leader explains the UMC isn't the only denomination that's drifting in that direction.