Compassion is proof of salvation – not the means, Mayor Pete

Monday, November 25, 2019
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Pete Buttigieg (green bkgrd)Rising Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg continues to try to reach out to Christians, but a well-known Southern Baptist pastor says "Mayor Pete" doesn't quite have the language.

The homosexual mayor from South Bend, Indiana, has publicly claimed faith in Christ and the desire to bring believers into the big Democratic tent. At the Democratic debate last week, he made this statement in regard to minority outreach:

Buttigieg: "I care about this because my faith teaches me that salvation has to do with how I make myself useful to those who have been excluded, marginalized, and cast aside and oppressed in society."

But Dr. Robert Jeffress of First Baptist-Dallas says he's about 180 degrees off from the true doctrines taught in the Bible.

Jeffress

"Pete Buttigieg is consistently trying to identify with people of faith, but he still doesn't seem to understand the very essence of biblical Christianity," says the senior pastor. "Yes, the result of my faith should be in compassion to other people, including those who are marginalized – but that is the proof of my salvation, it's not the means of my salvation."

According to Jeffress, Buttigieg is diving into what's known as "liberation theology," which sees the entire gospel through the lens of all manner of oppression.

"[He] is not the only one who has a misunderstanding of faith and [who] has embraced liberation theology – and I think it's important that we, as Christians, clarify what it truly means to be a Christian," he tells OneNewsNow.

Jeffress says it's imperative to keep the Christian faith in proper perspective. "I do think our Christianity demands that we show compassion to all people, including those who are marginalized. But that is the result, not the means of eternal life," he concludes.

Last week, OneNewsNow guest columnist Peter Heck took Buttigieg to task for what he described as "manipulating God's Word, twisting it, misinterpreting and misapplying it, [and] presenting a false gospel in the name of Jesus" – all to "justify acting on his own urges and desires." Such tactics, Heck argued, deserve censure and rebuke from Christians, if not all Americans.

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