Apologist: Immigration reform plan violates Romans 13

Tuesday, November 12, 2019
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Romans (Book of)A coalition of evangelical leaders has cobbled together what they say is a "call for restitution-based immigration reform" – but not all evangelical leaders are on board.

The plan, which is the brainchild of the Evangelical Immigration Table, calls for illegal immigrants to come out in the open, admit to violating the law, and pay "significant" fines and penalties ("in installments over a period of seven years"). That, says the EIT, would lead to a path to legal permanent residency.

"[Our plan] would address longstanding challenges without resorting to either mass deportation – which inherently would separate families – or amnesty, which would diminish respect for the rule of law," the group states.

But in fact, says Dr. Alex McFarland, it is amnesty – dressed up as Christian compassion. "There already is restitution-based immigration," he argues. "If you're a lawbreaker, you go own up to it and face the consequences of your illegal behavior."

And those consequences, he insists, are not paying fines and staying at the head of the line.

McFarland

"There has to be some deportations," he tells OneNewsNow, "and frankly, for the good of the order, there are some deportations that need to take place."

While those endorsing the plan explain it is "driven by biblical principles" – such as keeping families intact, offering restoration for those who have violated the law, and protecting the vulnerable – McFarland says it's also overlooking a few other biblical principles.

"We need to be careful on defining Christianity as being one who doesn't obey the law – because that runs counter to Romans 13," says the Christian apologist. "Who's the arbiter on telling me what laws I can break and not break – [or telling me] what laws I should break and not break?"

Signers of the Evangelical Call for Restitution-Based Immigration Reform include Leith Anderson of the National Association of Evangelicals, Danny Akin of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Samuel Rodriguez of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, and Dr. Russell Moore of the Southern Baptist Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Is it important to link Black Lives Matter with its ‘trained Marxist’ co-founders?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

1 of 2 protesters hit by car on closed Seattle highway dies
2 dead, 8 hurt in South Carolina nightclub shooting
Crunch, crunch: Africa’s locust outbreak is far from over
For nation’s birthday, Trump slams the enemies within
Kansas newspaper's post equates mask mandate with Holocaust
Heavy rain floods southern Japan; over a dozen presumed dead

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Portland police declare ‘riot’ again – as city sees 38th straight day of unrest
Chicago erupts in July 4 gunfire -- with girl, 7, and boy, 14, among those killed
Columbus statue toppled by Baltimore protesters
Trump defends US history, blasts 'radical left' in 'Salute to America' celebration
At UN Human Rights Council, 53 countries back China's draconian Hong Kong crackdown

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Consensus in a polarized society – Could it be?

church congregation (rear view)According to new research, religious freedom actually enjoys broad public support.