Ascol: Social justice movement 'greatest threat to gospel' I've ever seen

Tuesday, July 30, 2019
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Tom Ascol speakingAn organization that wants to call the Church to an historic and orthodox theology is warning that the Southern Baptist Convention is in deep trouble.

Founders Ministries is even making a documentary about the threat called By What Standard? God's World … God's Rules. The "cinedoc," as it's called, "presses those questions by showing how godless ideologies [such as Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality] are influencing evangelical thought and life." In the documentary, Founders president Tom Ascol (pictured) argues that many of those ideologies "have been smuggled into many evangelical churches and organizations through the Trojan horse of social justice." (See trailer for documentary below)

"The result is that, in the name of social justice, many unbiblical agendas are being advanced under the guise of honoring and protecting women, promoting racial reconciliation, and showing love and compassion to people experiencing sexual dysphoria." (from "About the Film")

Ascol, in an interview with OneNewsNow, says the social justice movement is a danger to the evangelical community because it's based on perpetual guilt or victimhood, which is antithetical to a biblical understanding of the born-again Christian – forgiven and on an equal footing with every other believer.

"Once you start telling people to think about themselves that way or to see the world that way, you can kiss the gospel goodbye," warns the senior pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Cape Coral, Florida.

And he's willing to name names, starting with Russell Moore of the SBC's Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission.

"… I've tried to voice concerns about [the ERLC] as well. I don't think it's being led well," Ascol shares. "Honest questions … are asked of Russell Moore by messengers who pay his salary – and [when they] see the obfuscation that he gives in response to those questions, you can't help but wonder, What's going on?"

It's a "ploy of the Devil," he explains.

"I do want to be clear on that. The Devil is a conspirator – and I think the Devil is making one massive play on many evangelicals today, and he's doing it under the Trojan horse of social justice," Ascol concludes. "I think it's very serious. I think this is the greatest threat to the gospel that I've seen in my lifetime."

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