Mega-church pastor questions multi-campus model

Tuesday, March 19, 2019
 | 
Bill Bumpas (OneNewsNow.com)

David Chadwick (NC pastor)A prominent North Carolina pastor who is stepping down from a mega-church he oversaw is sharing his doubts about the multi-site church model.  

David Chadwick (pictured at right), 69, has resigned as pastor of the 4,000-member Forest Hill Church in Charlotte after leading the congregation for 40 years. The church has grown from a 180-member church to a six-campus ministry.

Chadwick told The Charlotte Observer that he is not retiring from the ministry but “re-firing” to pursue other ministry opportunities, and he remains open to pastoring a smaller congregation elsewhere.

He told the newspaper he is leaving behind a job that operated more like a CEO who oversees150 employees and a $25 million budget, when his passion is preaching the Word.

“It’s so much --- meetings, planning, staff oversight, job performance reviews, all those things,” he said.

Vicari

Chadwick directly told the Observer he has doubts over the multi-church model, acknowledging that churches across the country are following it including the popular Elevation Church that is also located in Charlotte.

“I know I’m a good communicator … I can have people come and listen,” the pastor observed. “But doesn’t a pastor need to speak to his people? So I began to struggle with that, too.”

Chelsen Vicari with the Institute on Religion & Democracy tells OneNewsNow that some well-known churches have transitioned from the mult-site model towards autonomous, local sites such as Redeemer Church led by Tim Keller, and Matt Chandler's Village Church in Texas.

There are certainly pros and cons to the multi-campus model, Vicari says, but she says the biggest negative is the impersonal feel of a huge congregation.

“And folks can easily get lost in the crowd,” she observes, “and so (they) tend to not be deeply committed to the church or their local ministry."

There is also the danger of a “celebrity pastor” leading a mega-church and a pastor enduring burnout due to the immense responsibility, she adds.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Just once, I'd like to see the secular media …

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Curfews ordered in more than dozen US cities
Protests heat up across US, governors call in National Guard
FBI says its top lawyer is leaving the bureau
‘Back in the game’: SpaceX ship blasts off with 2 astronauts
National Guard summoned to aid cities amid police clashes
Pentagon puts military police on alert to go to Minneapolis
What’s behind latest India-China border tension

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump says will not allow mob violence to rule
Knife-wielding woman shot and killed by police, days after her brother was arrested for ISIS terror plot
Opinion — Andrew McCarthy: Laws against rioting and terrorism must be enforced against Antifa and other violent radicals
Supreme Court rejects challenge to limits on church services; Roberts sides with liberals
In unusual move, US embassies in Africa speak up on Floyd

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Report: 400 Ill. Catholic clergy sexually abused children

Catholic bishopsA law firm specializing in childhood sexual abuse has compiled a report on victims of Catholic clergy in Illinois and found nearly 400 clergy members were credibly accused or actually convicted over several decades.