Silence from pulpits on issue of life needs to stop: pastors' group

Tuesday, January 29, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

pregnant African-American womanGet to know your lawmakers and talk more about the life issue. That's what the head of the American Pastors Network is recommending for clergy following New York's passage of some of the toughest pro-abortion protections in the U.S.

Last week, just days after the annual observation of "Sanctity of Human Life Sunday," New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law the Reproductive Health Act – which columnist Dr. Michael Brown describes as an "utterly Orwellian" name for legislation he deems "murderous" and reflective of "moral bankruptcy."

Brown isn't alone in his criticism of the law that not only codifies many abortion rights laid out in Roe v. Wade and other court rulings, but establishes a "fundamental right" to abortion – even up until just before a baby's birth.

"The matter of life ought to be in almost every sermon," says Sam Rohrer of American Pastors Network. "Every sermon ought to contain the salvation plan that leads to spiritual life, and that ought to be a part of every sermon."

Rohrer, Sam (PPN)And not just on the anniversary of the landmark 1973 Supreme Court ruling that legalized abortion in the United States, he says. "Part of the reason why we've seen such pro-death victories, just like we saw in New York, is because the pulpits of America have been too silent on this subject and treating it maybe only once a year – if, in fact, they have actually discussed it any time per year."

Rohr calls New York's Reproductive Health Act "perhaps the worst of anything I've seen in this country."

"I termed it in our radio program a declaration of war by the State of New York against the unborn," he continues. "I don't think you can look at it any other way than that – it is atrocious."

For that reason, Rohr has laid down a challenge. "Pastors should take the lead in reaching out and getting to know the people [elected to] represent them on a name-by-name basis, and talk to them and communicate directly about what they believe ought to be done and what the representation ought to look like," he urges.

Related article: New York's new abortion law is terrible, just like Roe v. Wade

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