TX legislature circles wagons around pastors

Friday, June 5, 2015
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

A high turnout of pastors at the Texas state capitol was one key to protecting them in the Lone Star State. 

The Texas legislature ended its session with bipartisan passage of the Pastor Protection Bill, which states that pastors are legally protected if they refuse to perform a same-gender "marriage" ceremony in the state.

Saenz, Jonathan (Texas Values)Jonathan Saenz of Texas Values says pastors showed up in larger numbers and faced down opponents that included the ACLU and Equality Texas, a homosexual advocacy group. 

Texas media and liberal groups claimed there was bipartisan support for the measure after some wording was clarified. 

On its website, Equality Texas lists the Pastor Protection Bill under "formerly opposed legislation." 

Conservative groups and homosexual activists are awaiting a U.S. Supreme Court decision coming in late June that will decide if the justices find a constitutional right to same-sex "marriage."

While homosexual activists await what they call "marriage equality," pro-family groups are concerned that a decision making it legal in all 50 states will eventually trickle down to local churches and pastors that preach homosexuality is sinful.

During debate of the bill, The Star-Telegram quoted a gay House member, Rep. Celia Israel, who predicted on the House floor that homosexual "marriage" would one day become legal in Texas.

When that day comes, she said, she and her partner will not seek a conservative pastor to "bless our union." 

"I will being going to someone who loves and respects us for who we are," she said, according to The Houston Chronicle

Yet homosexual couples have sought to legally punish Christian cake bakers, photographers, florists and other business owners for refusing to be part of their wedding ceremony, using local non-discrimination ordinances or state laws to seek punishment.

Texas pastors in the Houston were infamously targeted by that city's lesbian mayor, who approved a court subpoena for copies of their sermons and even private communications such as emails. The mayor finally backed down after public pressure. 

"There continues to be this message communicated that even people of faith are not protected when it comes to the issue of their decisions on marriage," Saenz observes. 

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What would you say is Joe Biden's biggest liability in his quest for the Democratic nomination?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Parachutists jump over Dutch heath to mark WWII operation
Hong Kong protesters burn flag, police fire pepper spray
Area 51 events mostly peaceful; thousands in Nevada desert
Trump, in call, urged Ukraine to investigate Biden's son
Hurricane Lorena threatens Mexico's resort-studded Baja
US to send troops to Saudi Arabia, hold off on striking Iran
Houston area sees relief, rescues after Imelda leaves 4 dead

LATEST FROM THE WEB

'Almost impossible mission': The 8,000-mile nonstop flight to save a US soldier's life
School cancels football game days after cheerleaders are punished for pro-Trump banner
Trey Gowdy rips 'deeply partisan' Adam Schiff
How Elizabeth Warren used fake Native American identity to get ahead
New details reported on Trump-Ukraine call as Dems clash with White House on complaint

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Evangelicals have become largest Christian group

While a recent survey showed that Christianity is on the decline in America, a longtime Christian leader says there's some very encouraging data about evangelicals.