Boston business owners glad to see mayor leave

Friday, January 8, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Dept. of Labor buildingA Boston-based nonprofit says the prospect of Beantown's mayor leaving to take a post in the Biden administration is the "best news" the city's struggling businesses and taxpayers have heard in some time – because it means there will be "one less corrupt politician in the state."

President-elect Joe Biden announced on Thursday he has selected Boston Mayor Marty Walsh as his labor secretary. The 53-year-old Walsh, a former union worker who has a long history with labor, has served as the Democratic mayor of Boston since 2014. Prior to that, he was head of the Boston Building Trades Council which represents thousands of union construction workers.

Paul Craney, spokesperson and board member at the nonpartisan Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance, spoke with One News Now about Walsh. The mayor, he says, will undoubtedly adopt a new description: rubber stamp.

Craney

"He will do whatever Big Labor asks him to do," Craney said in reference to the mayor. "I'm very pleased that he's getting out of Massachusetts, [and] I think businesses in Boston have a reason to celebrate today – but that's probably to the detriment of the United States."

Among other things, the Alliance contends Walsh has "ugly ties to union bosses" and was "the largest receiver of union loophole money" in state history.

"He's never been known to be someone who advocates for any type of business [or] employer concerns," Craney added. "He has always, 100% of the time, sided with any labor policy that's put before him. He's a mediocre politician – and he will be a rubber stamp for anything any union boss brings before him that lands on his desk."

Perhaps that's why Walsh's nomination was praised by union leaders Thursday, among them the president of the AFL-CIO.

"Boston Mayor Marty Walsh will be an exceptional labor secretary for the same reason he was an outstanding mayor: he carried the tools. As a longtime union member, Walsh knows that collective bargaining is essential to building back better by combating inequality, beating COVID-19 and expanding opportunities for immigrants, women and people of color," Richard Trumka said in a statement published on TheHill.com.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWS BRIEF

FEATURED PODCAST

VOTE IN OUR POLL

How often do you 'mask up' because of the pandemic?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

  Bus heading to Grand Canyon rolls over; 1 dead, 2 critical
  More heads roll at US-funded international broadcasters
  Russia arrests 350 protesters demanding Navalny’s release
Schumer: Trump impeachment trial to begin week of Feb. 8
Arizona, 15th state with legal pot, sees recreational sales
Nevada church presses US Supreme Court on COVID-19 limits
Thousands of Hong Kongers locked down to contain coronavirus

LATEST FROM THE WEB

'We'll do something': Trump offers first remarks since leaving office
National Guard mulls keeping a few thousand troops in D.C. until March
California is dead last in administering COVID-19 vaccine after Alabama pulls ahead in key metric
An open letter to Trump supporters
On day one, Biden destroys women’s sports with anti-science executive order

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Media: Biden will continue Trump's get-tough China policy

China Shipping Line (Chinese goods)A human-rights advocate and expert on China says the Trump administration successfully challenged China’s authoritarian government but questions if the Biden administration will continue to do so.