Nationwide lockdown? Not a likely scenario …

Friday, November 13, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

padlock and chainOne of Joe Biden's medical advisors is suggesting a lockdown of four to six weeks could control the coronavirus pandemic and revive the economy. Whether those effects are within the realm of possibility, a researcher explains that shutting the country down isn't.

Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH told Yahoo News that we have a "big pool of money out there right now that we could borrow at historically low interest rates by the federal government."

"We could pay for a package right now to cover all of the lost wages for individual workers, for losses to small companies to medium-sized-companies, for cities, states, county governments," said Osterholm.

"If we did that, then we could lock down for four to six weeks; and if we did that, we could drive the numbers down, like they've done in Asia, like they did in New Zealand and Australia; and then we could really watch ourselves cruising into the vaccine availability in the first and second quarter of next year and bringing back the economy long before that."

Joel Griffith, research fellow in financial regulations for The Heritage Foundation, a center-right think tank headquartered in Washington, DC, says having a fully functioning economy is necessary for Americans to maintain their living.

Griffith

"Of course, that includes our quality health care, which we're fortunate to have because of our system that has produced so much abundance," Griffith tells OneNewsNow. "Another aspect is mental health and spiritual health."

But Griffith argues the federal government doesn't have the power to order a national lockdown.

"A bureaucrat or an officer or even an elected official in Washington, DC, does not have the power to shut down the amusement parks, the bars, the restaurants, and that churches," adds Griffith. "That's not legal. It's not constitutional. That would be a huge breach of executive power …. [Y]ou would see that litigated in the courts, and I am confident that that would not withstand constitutional scrutiny."

Earlier this week, Osterholm was appointed to Biden's 12-member COVID "advisory board."

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