Echoing oil-hating Left, Dem candidates push 'alternative' energy

Friday, March 13, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

fueling a big rigThis year's election has been labeled a referendum on a number of issues including the future of oil and natural gas.

"All realistic energy projections from the Energy Information Administration to International Energy Agency, which certainly promotes renewables, show out to 2050 that oil and natural gas will continue to grow in use," says Kathleen Sgamma of Western Energy Alliance, a pro-oil and gas outfit. "Their proportion may reduce slightly because of increases in renewables, but we will be using oil and natural gas through 2050."

Fossil fuels have long been an enemy of environmental activists who blame them for harming the environment. Those claims have amplified over climate change worries, since that same anti-Big Oil movement believes the Earth is only a decade away from enduring irreversible damage. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden both agree that man's burning of fossil fuels is contributing to man-made climate change. Sanders has called for taking fossil fuel companies to criminal court, and Biden has proposed putting fossil fuel executives in jail.

electric car chargingIn the meantime, both candidates are pushing alternative energy sources for electricity generation.

"They can certainly be a part of that electricity generation portfolio, but they basically do nothing in the realm of transportation,” says Sgamma. "And they don't do things like provide feed stock for medicines and fertilizers that grow our food, and they don't do home heating.”

When it comes to transportation, Sanders and Biden favor manufacturing electric vehicles while offering incentives to consumers to purchase those models. Demand for EVs, however, is nowhere near the same level as gas-powered vehicles, and Sgamma says everything has an impact on the environment.

"For example, with wind and solar you have a huge environmental impact when it comes to killing birds and bats, and also when it comes to all the mining that is required for wind and solar," she explains. "Those mines are overseas where they're not regulated by strict environmental regulations, and that impact is huge, but we don't see it here in the United States. So everybody gives them a pass as clean energy."

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