Left-wing groups sure to throw a curve to 'Roundtable'

Friday, September 6, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

"Celebrate Diversity" bannerNearly 200 CEOs who joined to form the Business Roundtable have signed a letter saying they are committed to leading their companies for the benefit of not just shareholders, but customers, employees, and other so-called stakeholders.

Justin Danhof of the National Center for Public Policy Research says the corporate leaders just opened a Pandora's box for left-wing activism.

"There is a well-worn pattern with these groups and I watch it every single year at dozens of companies," says Danhof, who attends shareholder meetings to confront companies and their left-wing polices. "What they will do,” he further explains, “is they will lobby these corporations to make a policy statement, which the Business Roundtable just did by the way, then, step two, which was already in the works when step one started, they say, Oh, well, we found all these actions that are "incongruous" with the policy statement that you just made. So, for example, if you say you support the environment, well, you can't donate to conservative politicians, right? They're all anti-environment.'"

According to Danhof, this strategy was employed against businesses such as the Walt Disney Company for it to reconsider its relationships with free-market proponents such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

"There is a new group that started that said if you have any statement on your website that supports women or ‘gender rights,’ whatever that is, well then you can't give to any conservative organization, Christian organization, or conservative politician that's ever supported a pro-life position, because that's anti-women," he continues.

Meanwhile, CEOs of publicly traded companies still have a legal obligation to their shareholders.

"There are some far-left politicians that now want to take this statement and change the law to make companies accountable to all 'stakeholders,' not just shareholders," warns Danhof. "So they already wrote this law essentially for these liberal politicians that want to move in that direction."

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

U.S. military efforts in Muslim-dominated countries are …

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Thousands cheer Trump at Texas rally
Pompeo seeks to reassure Israel amid Syria turmoil
Biden campaign facing serious financial woes
Gulf states brace for stormy weekend
Gunbattles rattle Mexican city after troops find Chapo's son
  Trudeau could lose power in Canada's election Monday

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Chicago teachers: for themselves, not the children
Public university tells professors not to grade based on merit
Study: Divorce rates plummet in Florida city thanks to Christian family initiative
A Texas mayor defends the constitution from Sharia law
Giuliani: The consigliere is carrying a grenade

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Business world: Warren unsupportable, will hurt us

Elizabeth Warren pointingDemocratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is finding that her ultra-left economic policies many consider socialist are unacceptable to corporate Americans, who see her wealth distribution scheme as geared to ultimately put them out of business.