'Diverse balance of thought' not on company's bucket list

Tuesday, June 11, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

unbalanced scalesA multibillion-dollar software company has been reminded that its focus should be on selling its products – not "using its outsized power as a weapon of left-wing social engineering."

Salesforce is a San Francisco-based software company used by many for profit and non-profit corporations. Justin Danhof of the National Center for Public Policy Research spoke to OneNewsNow after his visit to the Salesforce shareholder meeting last week, saying that Salesforce chairman and co-CEO Marc Benioff is a social engineer acting as a CEO.

"He is kind of the leader in pulling companies to the left to engage on social issues, such as gay marriage – and they've also been engaged in anti-religious freedom activities," Danhof tells OneNewsNow. "They were one of the big companies that rose up in 2015 against then-Governor Mike Pence (R-Indiana) when that state tried to pass a religious freedom law."

Danhof

The same thing happened in 2016 in Georgia, according to Danhof.

"[Benioff] announced that if you're a client of Salesforce you will no longer be allowed to use the product if you sell certain guns," the NCPPR spokesman continues. "Again, this guy is a social engineer acting as a CEO."

Danhof explains that he presented a proposal at the shareholder meeting. "I said 'Look, as any company with a balanced board of directors – and by balanced, I mean balanced in thought – there's no way you'd be running around engaging in social engineering. [Instead] you would be selling your software.'"

Salesforce rejected a resolution to have a politically diverse board of directors, but not everyone on the board dislikes the idea – so says Danhof:

"One of the board members came up to me afterwards and said, Look, you're more-right than you know and I'm in complete agreement with you – and perhaps if we had balance we could change what goes on here. It's clear he was a conservative offended by what Marc [Benioff] does, but he's clearly a lone voice in the board of directors. I'm not going to identify the individual lest his house be mobbed by the liberals who find out that he might be a conservative working in Silicon Valley."

This was the seventh time this year that Danhof has gone to a shareholder meeting to encourage political and ideological diversity on a corporate board.

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